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OLIVE OIL
DUCK FAT
BUTTER

 

 

HEALTH BENEFITS OF DUCK FAT

Image to left shows both Olive Oil and Duck Fat as a liquid at 76F.
Left: Olive Oil; Middle: Duck Fat and Right: Butter

Note: The melting point of Duck Fat is 14 C. The melting point of butter is between 32 C and 35 C (90 F and 95 C).

Duck fat contains 35.7% saturates, 50.5% monounsaturates (high in linoleic acid) and 13.7% polyunsaturated fats.(which contains Omega-6 and Omega-3 essential oils). This compares to olive oil which is: 75% monounsaturated fat (mostly oleic acid) 13% saturated fat and 10% Omega-6 linoleic acid and 2% Omega-3 linoleic acid.

ABOUT DUCK FAT

See Also: How to Render Duck Fat

Duck confit is one of my favorite dishes to cook for guests. It can be made several days ahead and stays well in the refrigerator immersed in duck fat for weeks. The only difficult part in preparing the dish is accumulating all the duck fat that is needed to completely cover the legs during cooking. If one purchases duck fat the cost of the dish rises sharply. . For that reason I tend to buy a whole duck, render my own duck fat and then use the carcass for duck stock. A whole duck can render approximately 12 oz. of fat. And, of course you will be left to two duck breasts for another meal.

Duck is actually a great value in cooking when one considers what a whole duck costs and what the end results are.

Furthermore, what many are unaware of is the health benefits to duck fat. Duck fat contains 35.7% saturates, 50.5% monounsaturates (high in linoleic acid) and 13.7% polyunsaturated fats.(Which contains Omega-6 and Omega-3 essential oils). This compares to olive oil which is: 75% monounsaturated fat (mostly oleic acid) 13% saturated fat and 10% Omega-6 linoleic acid and 2% Omega-3 linoleic acid. The main difference between chicken, turkey and duck is that duck contains more linoleic acid, which chicken and turkey contain a higher amount of polyunsaturated fats. It appears that duck and goose fat is more like olive oil than it is like butter or beef.

Additional Facts about Duck Meat --Source: Fatty Acids in Foods and Their Health Implications" Ching Kuang Chow

"Duck and goose muscle are predominantly dark muscle throughout the carcass. Duck muscle contains 5.95% lipid without the skin and 39.34% with skin. Muscle alone contains 50.3% saturated, 33.4% monounsaturated and 16.3% polyunsaturated fatty acids, whereas duck with skin contains 35.7% saturates; 50.5% monounsaturates and 13.7% polyunsaturates As with chicken and turkey the addition of the skin increases the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids in the lipid from duck. The major fatty acids in duck fat are similar to those in chicken and turkey except for the absence of long chain PUFA's and a higher proportion of linoleic acid. " Source: "Fatty Acids in Foods and Their Health Implications" Ching Kuang Chow

     
  Starting with a whole duck saves money.
     
 

Cut up the duck....

You can use breasts for excellent crispy duck breasts (See recipes below)... legs for confit or rillettes... and carcass and wings for stock.

     
  Cleaning off the carcass and rendering the duck fat will yield approximately 12 oz. See -- How to Make Duck Fat

 

The French Paradox

In the United States, 315 of every 100,000 middle-aged men die of heart attacks each year. In France the rate is 145 per 100,000. However, In the Gascony region, where goose and duck liver form a staple of the diet, this rate is only 80 per 100,000 (See below: Can Foie Gras aid the heart?) This phenomenon has recently gained international attention as the French Paradox --They eat more fat in Gascony than anyplace else, but they live the longest .

STORING DUCK FAT

It is important in storing duck fat that there are no water soluble products in the fat. This can increase the level of oxidation and decrease the lifetime of the fat. After leaving the fat to rest in the refrigerator for a day or two remove and scrape off the liquid at the bottom which will be an excellent source of rich duck stock for your sauce (See image below).

Also skim any nonfat substances that may have risen to the top of the fat. What's left will stay fresh in the refrigerator for a long period of time and can be used again for confit or frying vegetables -- it is an excellent alternative to butter.

Articles

How to Render Duck Fat

The Truth about Saturated Fats

The Duck Stops Here

Can Foie Gras Aid the Heart? A French Scientist Says Yes

The French Paradox

Characterizing Quality of Rendered Duck Fat



RECIPES WITH DUCK

duck confit with mesclun and roasted potatoes
DUCK RILLETTES WITH SEARED SCALLOP, POLENTA AND SPINACH


Science of Cooking


Science Behind Food and Cooking in the Kitchen

   
 
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